Small Ballmoss and Milk Conch Renderings

Date: 1-27-17
Allison Gatyas
Class: IDS-H. Audubon                          Instructors: Professor Lemeh and Dr. Moore
Blog Entry #3
Word Count: 587                                             Pod or Vod-cast: No
Reading assignment: No

Location: Classroom 104
Time of Day: 10:15 a.m
Species: Tillandsia recurvata
Common Name: Small Ballmoss
Scientific Name:Tillandsia recurvata
Size/Dimension: 3 inches
Weight: unknown
Color: Light green with fuzzy white hairs
Image:

IMG_1219.JPG

Image of the specimen Dr. Moore collected.

img_1228

Image comparing the color of the specimen to the color of my pencils.

Scanned Image of my rendering:

Ballmoss.jpeg

I scanned the image many times and learned I just need to draw darker so I included a photo of the sketch.

IMG_1225 (1).JPG

IMG_1226.JPG

 

Discussion:

Today’s exercise included drawing a ball moss specimen to practice using depth. Patience is not my strong suit so this was my best try at drawing such thin leaves. My favorite part about using my field studies journal is learning about plants and other species. The ball moss is part of the pine family, akin to pineapples. It is a non-parasitic species that hangs out in trees such as live oaks and magnolias due to its airflow and moisture and it photosynthesizes its own food. Ball moss is also being used to induce cell death in numerous cells by apoptosis (programmed cell death) and to use as a treatment for HIV/AIDS.

In my rendering, I noted 2 areas where a sprout of the ball moss had three leaves coming out of it. There was a small twig coming out of the tangled moss presumably from a live oak tree. The specimen had tons of tiny, white, fuzzy hairs all over its leaves.

 

Location: Classroom 104
Time of Day: 10:15 a.m
Species: Lobatus costatus
Common Name: Fossil Milk Conch
Scientific Name: Lobatus costatus
Size/Dimension: 3.5 inches
Weight: unknown
Color: White with beige color stain from being buried in sand.
Image:

IMG_1230.JPG

Top view of Milk Conch

IMG_1233.JPG

View from spiral on Milk Conch

IMG_1232.JPG

Bottom view of Milk Conch

Photos of Image of Rendering: ( Scans would not come out because I drew too lightly, something to keep in mind the next time I am drawing.)

IMG_1229 (1).JPG

IMG_1236.JPG

Discussion:

Dr.Moore found this specimen when there was construction going on at the campus. The shell is 3.5 inches long with 7 spirals that have several dull spikes. It was drawn under classroom lighting. The conch had multiple carved out lines probably from water flowing past it, akin to the grand canyon. Whilst drawing my conch, Professor Lemeh showed me how to use my erasure to make my shading resemble the lines that are in the shell. The shell has a hard white exterior and on the underbelly, there is a small light sand stain from being buried in the ground. The hole is compacted with sediment and other specimens.

Milk conchs are part of the mollusk family and the shell is usually inhabited by a sea snail. I was doing research about milk conchs and I found this crazy picture of the snail in its snail. They have cute long eye stalks and when they get disturbed they suck themselves back into their shell. Simply adorable.

 

Application: Drawing a ballmoss in context.

Location: Outside of building SR by the Police Station
Time of Day: 10:15 a.m
Species: Tillandsia recurvata
Common Name: Small Ballmoss
Scientific Name:Tillandsia recurvata
Size/Dimension: 4.5 inches
Weight: unknown
Color: Light green with fuzzy white hairs
Image:

IMG_1239.JPG

This is my reference photo of the ballmoss plant that I drew in context to it’s habitat.

IMG_1238.JPG

While I was sitting under the tree I had noticed another milk conch sitting underneath the tree. Just a funny coincidence.

Photo of Drawing:

 

 

Sources:

http://www.gastropods.com/5/Shell_215.shtml

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobatus_costatus

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tillandsia_recurvata

http://floridata.com/Plants/Bromeliaceae/Tillandsia%20recurvata/574

http://www.snorkelstj.com/milk-conch.html

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